Ad Spotlight: The Emily Program

Have you ever seen an ad that gets you right in the gut? Recently, I was driving to my parents’ house and saw the below billboard:

Emily Program Billboard
Courtesy of The Minneapolis Egotist

What Makes it Great

As someone who has known several friends battle through anorexia, I know that the lack of understanding is often the biggest hurdle. One friend who shared her story with me said that a lot of her struggle had nothing to do with losing weight at all: it was about control over her body, and therefore, some semblance of control over her life. This crucial need for understanding why is something so many people battle, not just those with eating disorders. The text’s simplicity conveys the specialists’ warm and caring attitudes; additionally, The Emily Program’s main color is the same vibrant orange. Read More »

Chobani’s #NoBadStuff Campaign: False Advertising vs. Speaking the Truth

You may have heard about Chobani’s commercials that point out the evils of some of the ingredients in their leading competitors’ products—most notably, Dannon and Yoplait. Chobani labeled this campaign as #nobadstuff, claiming its Greek yogurt was the only one on the market not to contain preservatives. (The way Chobani did this, however, was to point out that some of the ingredients in its competitors’ brands were also ingredients in pesticides.) Yoplait sued Chobani for false advertising, and in turn, Chobani and Dannon also became entangled in a lawsuit.

Since then, the judge has ruled to pull Chobani’s ads on the charge that they were misleading. Chobani’s Chief Marketing and Brand Officer Peter McGuinness responded to the judge’s decision with this statement:

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Book Review: A Technique for Producing Ideas by James W. Young

The perks of graduating as an English major is that, unlike many of my engineering friends, I actually want to keep the books I bought for my classes. One of those books is A Technique for Producing Ideas by James W. Young. It’s smaller than most PDFs, totaling to about 28 pages.

While it felt silly at the time to spend money on it, I found the information it contained to be quite useful. It’s aimed primarily at those in advertising, but since I’m not the greatest generator of creative ideas, I thought it could help me a bit. Here are the steps it provides for trying to come up with brilliant ideas, whether they’re needed for a new campaign or your next novel:

  1. Gather Information: Learn as much as you can about the topic you’re working on, be it your target audience or the concept that’s intrigued you. Learn everything you can—from the menial to the exciting. Don’t forget to keep track of your information! The author suggests writing down each fact on a 3×5″ index card.

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